Since 1992 we are serving retail and institutional clients with our great tasting, all natural and freshly produced dairy products.

Fresh is best

We deliver daily except Mondays to our Rizal Dairy Farms Greenshop as well as our patrons in the hotel and restaurant industry within Metro Manila.

Outside Luzon, we are making our products available through airport-to-airport service to any destination in the Philippines for a minimum delivery of P 3’000.00 per delivery.

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Please request a product list for hotels and restaurants through reply slip below. For institutional buyers, we require 2-3 days prior notice for orders. For institutional buyers, we develop customized dairy products upon request Orders for customized products are subjected to minimum orders.

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Milk

RIZAL DAIRY FARMS PRODUCT LIST

Prices as per January 2015

photo 2 Fresh Pasteurised Milk
1 liter bottles
shelf life: approx. 7 days

Price: P130.00/liter

photo-1a Buttermilk
Buttermilk

1 liter bottles

shelf life: approx. 14 days

Serving suggestion:

Use for baking, pancakes and buttermilk-fruit shakes can be frozen up to one month

Price: P 150.00/liter

Carabao milk Carabao Milk
Carabao Milk

1 liter bottles

Price: P 180.00/liter

Cheese

RIZAL DAIRY FARMS PRODUCT LIST

Prices as per January 2015

Mozarella Mozzarella
in brine

shelf life: approx. 7 days

Serving suggestion:

Ideal for tomato mozzarella salad and gourmet pizza

Price: P 225.00/200 grams

mozzarelini Mozzarellini
“Boconccini”, in brine

shelf life: approx 7 days

Serving suggestion:

Use for cocktails and salads

Price: P 225.00/200 grams

photo 2 Mozzarella block
vacuum packed

shelf life: approx. 14 days,

can be frozen for one month

Serving suggestion:

use for pizza and lasagna

Price: P 225.00/200 grams

Kesong Puti Kesong Puti
vacuum packed

shelf life: approx. 14 days

Serving suggestion:

enjoy with fresh pandesal, use as appetizer, dice in 1/8”to top salad greens

photo 1 Ricotta cheese
vacuum packed

shelf life: approx 14 days

Serving suggestion:

Use for ricotta-spinach ravioli, and lasagna as  or in combination with béchamel sauce, dice in 1/8”and top on pasta as a low fat, low sodium alternative to parmesan,

delicious on sandwiches with fresh lettuce and pesto sauce

Price: P 225.00/250 grams

Cheese-Curd1 Cheese Curd
vacuum packed

shelf life: approx. 14 days

Serving suggestion:

Ideal for grilling and baking, traditionally used for traditional Canadian dish “Putine”

Reduced fat cheese toast:

top a slice of whole wheat bread with thin slices of cheese curd, toast, sprinkle with freshly ground pepper

Price: P 200.00/200 grams

photo 4 Sour cream
shelf life: approx. 14 days

Price: P 100.00/350 grams tumbler

photo 3 Swiss Quark
low fat

shelf life: approx. 14 days

Serving suggestion:
use as low fat substitute for sour cream, ideal to bake reduced fat cheese cake as substitute for cream cheese, makes great savoury dips or sweet desserts by adding fresh fruits and honey

Price: P 120.00/350 grams

Yoghurt

yogurt or yoghurt (ˈjəʊɡət, ˈjɒɡ-, ˈjəʊɡət, ˈjɒɡ-) — n a thick custard-like food prepared from milk that has been curdled by bacteria, often sweetened and flavoured with fruit, chocolate, etc
Shelf life: to extend shelf life, yogurt can be frozen

RIZAL DAIRY FARMS PRODUCT LIST

Prices as per January 2015

photo 1 Greek style yoghurt
full fat, sugar free

Price: P 140.00/350 grams

photo 2 Greek style yoghurt
low fat, sugar free

Price: P 140.00/350 grams

Yogurt pictures Set yoghurts
custard like texture

low fat and non-fat, natural, sugar free

Price: P 100.00/300 grams

photo Creamy yoghurt
low fat, sugar free

light and creamy texture

this yoghurt is ideal for fruit and mint lassi, savoury dips, salad dressing and dessert

Price: P 100.00/300 grams

photo 3 Creamy yoghurt
fruit flavored made with fresh fruit puree,

Mango and Strawberry flavour

Price: P 120.00/300 grams

Two kilo tubs available upon order for pick-up at Rizal Dairy Farms Greenshop, a Market Market,

Salcedo Saturday Market

Centris Sunday Market

Please give 2-3 days prior notice

Creamy Yogurt Low-fat Yoghurts
non fat, low fat, natural, sugar free

2 kilo tubs

Price: P 420.00 per tub

greekyogurt Greek style yoghurt
full fat and low fat, 2 kilo tub

Price: P 700.00/tub

sourcream Sour cream
2 kilo tub

P 520.00/tub

swisswuark Swiss Quark
2 kilo tub

Price: P 600.00 per tub

Also Available

RIZAL DAIRY FARMS PRODUCT LIST

Prices as per January 2015

photo 1 Coconut vinegar
naturally fermented from organically grown coconuts

Price: P 450.00/gallon

photo 3 Mascobado sugar
organically produced

Price: P 120.00/1 kilo

Price: P 65.00/500 grams

photo 2 Coconut sugar
made from coconut sap

Price: P 400.00/1 kilo

Price: P 200.00/500 grams

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SERVING SUGGESTIONS FOR RIZAL DAIRY FARM’S CHEESES

KESONG PUTI
Typically served with pandesal, but equally delicious with baguette or whole wheat bread, especial-ly in form of sandwich with fresh tomato, freshly ground pepper and some salad leaves.
Best paired with white or light red wine

RICOTTA CHEESE
An Italian type cheese that is low in fat content, high in protein and calcium,
can be used for savoury dishes or desserts
Serving suggestions:
• Sandwiches with pesto sauce and grilled vegetables
• Diced to top pasta dishes instead of parmesan
• diced as topping on mixed salads
• served with freshly sliced mango and wine
• cheese cakes

Can be paired with white and red wine, or dessert wine

MOZZARELLA CHEESE IN BRINE
An Italian type cheese that is typically used to prepare tomato-mozzarella salad (ensalata caprese); it melts beautifully on pizzas, or can be used to prepare mozzarella cheese toasts.
Best paired with light red wines

Cheese Curd
Is a specialty of Rizal Dairy Farms that is best used for grilling and baked dishes. It is lower in fat content than commercial processed cheeses and is free of any additives or colorants. Ideal to pre-pare cheese toasts. The Canadian dish Poutine is made from cheese curd.
Best paired with white or red wine

Swiss Quark
Though it may not seem so, Swiss Quark is technically a cheese. In French it is a “fromage blanc battu”. It is ideal for savoury dips mixed and seasoned with fresh herbs, salt, pepper and other spi-ces; sweet dessert topped with fresh fruits or fruit purees. It can be used for baking cheese cakes. Use as substitute for recipes that require cream cheese, which is multiple times higher in fat content. Our version is made from low fat milk.

where2findus

Where to find us?

RDF Salcedo Saturday Market copy

Salcedo Saturday Market

Saturdays from 6.00 AM – 1.00 PM

location: Salcedo Park, Salcedo Village, Makati City access from J.P. Leviste and Tordesillas Street

Cetris Market

Sidcor Centris Sunday Market

Sundays from 6.00 AM – 1.00 PM

location: Along EDSA, before Centris Train Station when coming from South. Look out for  McDonalds drive through and Expert Global Solutions Building. It’s located on empty lot behind Mc Donald and  before on  Expert Global Solutions Bldg. Parking is available.

RDF Greenshop @ Market Market

RIZAL DAIRY FARMS Greenshop

Daily 9.00AM – 9.00 PM

Market Market, Mc Kinley Parkway, Fort Bonifacio, Taguig City, Metro Manila Telephone: 02-729 03 04

Place your orders and pick it up at any of the retail locations.

 Deliveries within Metro Manila require P 3000.00 minimum order and two days prior notice.

 We provide airport to airport service for all domestic airport destinations.

Minimum order P 3000.00

three days prior notice.

 We accept dealership inquiries in provinces.

healthyLifeStyleCookingClasses

Healthy Lifestyle Cooking Classes

Chef Jacqueline Haessig Alleje, a 3rd generation restaurateur, has been involved in culinary arts and organic agriculture based on the principles of healthy nutrition and sustainable food production for over 20 years in the Philippines as co-owner of Rizal Dairy Farms with husband Tony Alleje and as president of Organic Farming Inc. Swiss born and trained, Jacqui is a pioneer in healthy lifestyle cooking and organic farming.She has developed & promoted for over 8 years a “South Beach Diet” reflecting the principles of a healthy lifestyle diet and organic agriculture with a Swiss-Filipino twist. She teaches at Heny Sison Culinary School.

South Beach Diet Cooking Class

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If you like to learn about

  • the principles of a healthy diet using organic and natural ingredients,
  • how to radically or moderately lose weight and maintain the desired weight
  • how to cook the dishes that will form part of your diet
  • understand the dynamics of flavours from herbs and other spices

then you should watch out for the South Beach Diet Cooking Class schedule.

Artisan Bread Baking Class

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Wanting to eat great tasting, healthy bread that is freshly baked without having to run to a specialty shop?

Looking for meaningful, health-promoting gifts?

Join the Artisan Bread Baking Class.

Other Classes:

Healthy Muffins, Home made ice cream, Crepes and Pancakes

For schedules, please visit the website of Heny Sison Culinary School

http://www.henysison.com/

Offering Lectures on Organic Agriculture Principles of Healthy Nutrition Cooking Classes for private and corporate groups Inquire: jha@rizaldairy.com

aboutmilk

Frequently Asked Questions About Milk

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT MILK

Pasteurization of milk requires temperatures of about 145 °F (63 °C) for about 30 minutes, or higher temperatures for shorter periods. The treatment destroys any disease-causing organisms (principally Mycobacterium tuberculosis) as well as organisms that cause spoilage.

Definition of Pasteurization according to Wikipedia

Pasteurization (American English) or pasteurisation (French, and British English) is a process invented by French Scientist Louis Pasteur during the nineteenth century. Pasteur discovered that heating milk to a high temperature then swiftly cooling it before bottling it, enabled the milk to remain fresher for an extended period of time. Today the process of pasteurizaton is used widely in the drinks and foodindustry. This process slows spoilage caused by microbial growth.

Unlike sterilisation, pasteurization is not intended to kill all micro-organisms in the food. Instead, it aims to reduce the number of viablepathogens so they are unlikely to cause disease (assuming the pasteurized product is stored as indicated and is consumed before its expiration date). Commercial-scale sterilisation of food is not common because it adversely affects the taste and quality of the product. Certain foods, such as dairy products, may be superheated to ensure pathogenic microbes are destroyed.

What is Homogenization?

Homogenization is the process of breaking down the fat globules in milk so that they stay integrated rather than separating as cream. When you see milk labeled as “cream on top,” it means that milk has not been homogenized. Homogenization is a purely physical process; nothing is added to the milk. Some scientists argue that milk is more digestible when homogenized and others argue that the milk fat globules are too rapidly absorbed when homogenized.

The majority of commercially available milk sold in the Philippines is homogenized.

What is UHT Pasteurization?

Ultra-high temperature processing, (less often) ultra-heat treatment (both abbreviated UHT), or ultra-pasteurization is the sterilization of food by heating it for an extremely short period, around 1–2 seconds, at a temperature exceeding 135°C (275°F), which is the temperature required to kill spores in milk.

According to the McMillian Dictionary:

UHT Milk: Milk that has been heated to a very high temperature so that it stays fresh longer.

This is positive, both for the consumers and the producers as it makes a highly perishable product less perishable, and easier to handle, transport and store.

Possible negative aspects of UHT pasteurization:

The introduction to a 2005 study published in the Journal of Dairy Science highlighted the current problems with UHT processing from an industry point of view:

Often, heat treatment causes milkfat globule membrane proteins and whey proteins to unfold such that buried sulfhydryl (-SH-) groups, normally masked in the native protein, are exposed to the outer surfaces (Hoffmann and van Mill, 1997). In turn, these processes produce extreme cooked flavors, often attributed to changes in the sulfhydryl and disulfide content of the protein fraction (Swaisgood et al., 1987).Conventional pasteurization methods have long been in place and with the advent of UHT technology, the sterilization of fluid milk was achieved using higher temperature treatments for shorter periods. However, shelf-stable milk has met with limited acceptability by the consumer, especially in the United States, due in part to a high cooked flavor. Several attempts to improve the quality of UHT-treated milk products proved successful to varying degrees. Previously, Swaisgood and coworkers used immobilized sulfhydryl oxidase to reduce the thiol content of UHT-heated skim milk and described an improved flavor after enzymatic oxidation to form protein disulfide bonds (Swaisgood et al., 1987). Other studies have showed that altering UHT processing parameters, such as indirect vs. direct steam injection systems, cooling rates, and long-term storage conditions have a significant impact on sensory attributes (Browning et al., 2001). Most recently,epicatechin, a flavonoid compound, was added to UHT milk prior to heating, and the results revealed partial inhibition of thermally generated cooked aroma (Colahan-Sederstrom and Peterson, 2005).

In short:

UHT milk doesn’t taste as good as freshly pasteurized or raw milk. And if the recourse to inhibit the “high cooked”or “slightly burned”flavors, then it’s maybe not the product you are looking for:

FRESH, GREAT TASTING ALL NATURAL MILK.

Health risk or not?

According to an information taken from the website of www.westonaprice.org, it is a harmful process

In the commercial processing of UHT milk, raw milk is first preheated to 176-194°F, then submitted to one of two heating methods: direct or indirect. In the direct method, milk is injected with superheated steam or the milk is sprayed into steam. This raises the temperature of the milk immediately, but also slightly dilutes it. The extra water is removed when the milk is subsequently cooled in a vacuum chamber. Indirect heating occurs by bringing milk into contact with super-heated metal plates that have been heated by steam–hence, the steam is “indirectly”heating the milk. Some new systems combine the two processes.

According to Lee Dexter, microbiologist and owner of White Egret Farm goat dairy in Austin, Texas, ultra-pasteurization is an extremely harmful process to inflict on the fragile components of milk. Dexter explains that milk proteins are complex, three-dimensional molecules, like tinker toys. They are broken down and digested when special enzymes fit into the parts that stick out. Rapid heat treatments like pasteurization, and especially ultra-pasteurization, actually flatten the molecules so the enzymes cannot do their work. If such proteins pass into the bloodstream (a frequent occurrence in those suffering from “leaky gut,”a condition that can be brought on by drinking processed commercial milk), the body perceives them as foreign proteins and mounts an immune response. That means a chronically overstressed immune system and much less energy available for growth and repair

Note that the Weston A. Price Foundation is actively campaigning for the legalisation of raw milk, which they call the “Real Milk”, which is milk that has not been pasteurized, nor homogenized. Interesting reads on this topic can be found on their website as well

Nutrients in Milk

Nutritional Components in Milk

Milk is often considered as a complete food for it does indeed contain lots of nutrients, and is at the same time a good source of water, since about 87 % of milk is water.

The information below is taken from http://milkfacts.info.

Energy

The energy in milk comes from its protein, carbohydrate and fat content, with the exception of skim milk that has virtually no fat. The energy content of some milk varieties is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables.

Food provides energy to the body in the form of calories (kcal). There are many components in food that provide nutritional benefits, but only the macronutrients protein, carbohydrate and fat provide energy. The energy value of a food is calculated based on the calories provided by the amount of protein (4 kcal/gram), carbohydrate (4 kcal/gram), and fat (9 kcal/gram) that is present.

Water

Milk is approximately 87% water, so it is a good source of water in the diet. The water content of some milk varieties is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables.

Water does not provide a nutritional benefit in the same manner as proteins or vitamins, for example. However, water is extremely important in human metabolism. Water is a major component in the body. Water maintains blood volume, transports nutrients like glucose and oxygen to the tissues and organs, and transports waste products away from tissues and organs for elimination by the body. Water helps to lubricate joints and cushions organs during movement. Water maintains body temperature regulation through sweating. Lack of water (dehydration) results in fatigue, mental impairment, cramping, and decreased athletic performance. Severe dehydration can be life-threatening.

Carbohydrate

Milk is approximately 4.9% carbohydrate in the form of lactose. The lactose content of some milk varieties is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables.

Carbohydrates are the primary source of energy for activity. Glucose is the only form of energy that can be used by the brain. Excess glucose is stored in the form of glycogen in the muscles and liver for later use. Carbohydrates are important in hormonal regulation in the body. Lack of adequate levels of glucose in the blood and carbohydrate stores leads to muscle fatigue and lack of concentration.

Lactose is a disaccharide made up of glucose and galactose bonded together. Before it can be used by the body, the bond must be broken by the enzyme lactase in the small intestine. People that have decreased activity of lactase in the small intestine may have problems digesting lactose and this is referred to as lactose intolerance or malabsorption.

Fat

Milk is approximately 3.4% fat. The fat content of some milk varieties is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables.

Fats are a structural component of cell membranes and hormones. Fats are a concentrated energy source and are the main energy source used by the body during low intensity activities and prolonged exercise over 90 minutes. Fat is the main storage form of excess energy in the body. Fats cushion organs during movement.

There are 2 fatty acids that are considered “essential”that cannot be made by the body and must come from the diet, and these are linoleic (18:2) and linolenic (18:3) acids. These fatty acids are used to synthesize the longer chain fatty acids arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4o-6), docopentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:4o-6), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5o-3) and docohexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6o-3). These fatty acids are essential for the synthesis of hormones such as prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes that are involved in muscle contraction, blood clotting, and immune response.

The fatty acids in milk fat are approximately 65% saturated, 29% monounsaturated, and 6% polyunsaturated. The polyunsaturated fatty acids in milk fat include small amounts of the essential fatty acids linoleic and linolenic, and approximately 5% trans fatty acids. An important trans fatty acid in milk fat is conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, 18:2). There are several types (isomers) of CLA in milk that have been shown to inhibit cancer and help maintain lean body mass while promoting the loss of body fat. The health benefits of CLA consumption are discussed in the Milk and Human Health section.

The health concerns associated with fats are often linked to the chemical differences in the fatty acids. Saturated and trans unsaturated fats have been associated with high blood cholesterol and heart disease. However, the relationships are not simple. The length of the fatty acid chain and source of the unsaturated bond (naturally-occurring or man-made through processing) can greatly influence the health consequences of a specific fat in the human diet. In addition, the genetics and health status of an individual greatly influences the impact of consuming different types of fats. The subject of fats and health is complex and constantly being updated in the medical literature. Issues relating to milk fat are discussed in the Milk and Human Health section.

The content of cholesterol in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Cholesterol is an important component of cell membranes and as a starting material for the production of bile salts and steroid hormones. The body manufactures cholesterol to ensure that an adequate level of cholesterol is available for body functions. High levels of blood cholesterol are associated with increased risk for heart disease and are discussed in the Milk and Human Health section. Cholesterol is associated with fat so the content will vary depending on the fat content of the dairy product. An 8 oz serving of 2% milk contains 8% of the Daily Reference Intake (DRI) for cholesterol.

Protein

Milk is approximately 3.3% protein and contains all of the essential amino acids. The protein content of some milk varieties is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables.

Proteins are the fundamental building blocks of muscles, skin, hair, and cellular components. Proteins are needed to help muscles contract and relax, and help repair damaged tissues. They play a critical role in many body functions as enzymes, hormones, and antibodies. Proteins may also be used as an energy source by the body.

Nine amino acids must be obtained from the diet and are referred to as the “essential”amino acids: leucine, isoleucine, valine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, histidine, threonine, methionine, and lysine. Proteins that contain all 9 essential amino acids are often called “complete”proteins. Proteins of animal origin and soy are complete proteins, whereas proteins from grains and legumes are missing 1 or more of the essential amino acids, which means that consumers must eat complementary foods in order to get all of the essential amino acids.

Milk protein consists of approximately 82% casein and 18% whey (serum) proteins. Both casein and whey proteins are present in milk, yogurt, and ice cream. In most cheeses the casein is coagulated to form the curd, and the whey is drained leaving only a small amount of whey proteins in the cheese. During cheese making, the 6-casein is cleaved between specific amino acids and results in a unique protein fragment that is drained with the whey. This fragment, called milk glycomacropeptide, does not have any phenylalanine and can be used as a source of protein for people with phenylketonuria, the inability to digest proteins that contain phenylalanine. Whey proteins have become popular ingredients in foods as an additional source of protein or for functional benefits. Whey proteins are used as a protein source in high protein beverages and energy bars targeted to athletes. Some examples include the use of whey proteins to bind water in meat and sausage products, provide a brown crust in bakery products, and provide whipping properties that replace a portion of egg whites.

Whey proteins contain immunoglobulins which are important in the immune responses of the body. Whey proteins contain branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, and valine) and have been proposed to have some benefits to athletes for muscle recovery and for preventing mental fatigue.

Vitamins

Vitamins have many roles in the body including metabolism co-factors, oxygen transport and antioxidants. They help the body use carbohydrates, protein, and fat. The functions of vitamins are described below in alphabetical order.

The content of vitamin A in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Vitamin A is a fat soluble vitamin involved in vision, gene expression, reproduction, and immune response. The compounds with vitamin A activity are called retinoids and are found in foods in different forms –typically animal foods provide retinol and retinyl esters, and plant foods provide ß-carotene, a starting molecule (precursor) for vitamin A synthesis. Milk contains retinol, retinyl esters, and ß-carotene. Dairy products are a good source of vitamin A, although the vitamin A content will vary with the fat content of the product. An 8 oz serving of 2% milk contains approximately 15% of the daily reference intake (DRI) for vitamin A.

The content of thiamin (vitamin B1) in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Thiamin is a water soluble vitamin that is an enzyme cofactor involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates and branched chain amino acids. An 8 oz serving of 2% milk contains approximately 8% of the DRI for thiamin.

The content of riboflavin (vitamin B2) in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Riboflavin is a water soluble vitamin that is an enzyme cofactor involved in electron transport reactions. Milk is a recommended source of riboflavin and an 8 oz serving of 2% milk provides approximately 35% of the DRI for riboflavin.

The content of niacin (vitamin B3) in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Niacin is a water soluble vitamin that is an enzyme cofactor involved in electron transport reactions required for energy metabolism. There is a small amount of niacin in milk, an 8 oz serving of 2% milk contains less than 2% of the DRI for niacin.

The content of pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Pantothenic acid is a water soluble vitamin that is an enzyme cofactor in fatty acid metabolism. Milk is a good source of pantothenic acid and an 8 oz serving of 2% milk contains approximately 17% of the DRI for pantothenic acid.

The content of vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Vitamin B6 is a water soluble vitamin involved in the metabolism of proteins and glycogen (energy stored in the liver and muscles), and in the metabolism of sphingolipids in the nervous system. An 8 oz serving of 2% milk contains approximately 7% of the DRI for vitamin B6.

The content of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Vitamin B12 is a water soluble vitamin involved in protein metabolism and blood functions. Milk is a recommended source of vitamin B12. An 8 oz serving of 2% milk contains approximately 47% of the DRI for vitamin B12.

The content of vitamin C in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Vitamin C is a water soluble vitamin that is an important antioxidant. It has a role in collagen formation in connective tissue and helps in iron absorption and healing of wounds and injuries. There is a negligible amount of vitamin C in milk, and a serving of milk contains less than 1% of the DRI for Vitamin C.

The content of vitamin D in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin that is important in maintaining blood calcium and phosphorus balance and assists calcium metabolism. Milk is typically fortified with vitamin D. Fortified milk is a good source of vitamin D, and an 8 oz serving of 2% milk contains over 50% of the DRI for vitamin D.

The content of vitamin E in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Vitamin E is a fat soluble vitamin that has antioxidant activity. The compounds with vitamin E activity are the tocopherols and tocotrienols. Milk contains a small amount of vitamin E, which increases with increasing fat content of dairy products. An 8 oz serving of whole milk contains 1% vitamin E, and an 8 oz serving of 2% milk contains only 0.5% of the DRI for vitamin E.

The content of folate in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Folate is one of the water soluble B vitamins. Folate is an enzyme cofactor important in the metabolism of proteins and nucleic acids and blood functions. There is a small amount of folate in milk. An 8 oz serving of 2% milk contains 3% of the DRI for folate.

The content of vitamin K in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Vitamin K is a fat soluble vitamin involved in blood clotting, bone metabolism, and protein synthesis. Milk contains a small amount of vitamin K, which increases with the fat content in dairy products. An 8 oz serving of milk contains less than 1% of the DRI for vitamin K.

Minerals

Minerals have many roles in the body including enzyme functions, bone formation, water balance maintenance, and oxygen transport. They help the body use carbohydrates, protein, and fat. The functions of minerals are described below in alphabetical order.

The content of calcium in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Calcium plays an essential role in bone formation and metabolism, muscle contraction, nerve transmission and blood clotting. Dairy products are a significant source of calcium in the diet. Milk is a recommended source of calcium, and an 8 oz serving contains almost 30% of the DRI for calcium.

The content of copper in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Copper is a component of enzymes used in iron metabolism. Milk contains a small amount of copper. An 8 oz serving of 2% milk contains approximately 3% of the DRI for copper.

The content of iron in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Iron is a component of blood and many enzymes. It is involved in blood metabolism and oxygen transport. Milk contains a small amount of iron, and an 8 oz serving of milk contains less than 1% of the DRI for iron.

The content of magnesium in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Magnesium is an enzyme cofactor and is important in bone metabolism. Milk is a recommended source of magnesium, and an 8 oz serving of 2% milk contains approximately 7% of the DRI for magnesium.

The content of manganese in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Manganese is involved in bone formation, and in enzymes involved in amino acid, cholesterol, and carbohydrate metabolism. There is a small amount of manganese in milk. An 8 oz serving contains less than 1% of the DRI.

The content of phosphorus in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Phosphorus is involved in maintaining body pH, in storage and transfer of energy, and in nucleotide synthesis. Milk is a recommended source of phosphorus, and an 8 oz serving of milk contains over 30% of the DRI for phosphorus.

The content of potassium in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Potassium is an electrolyte that is important in the maintenance of water balance, blood volume and blood pressure. Dairy products are a recommended source of potassium, and an 8 oz serving of milk contains approximately 8% of the DRI for potassium.

The content of selenium in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Selenium is important in oxidative stress response, electron transport, and regulation of thyroid hormone. Milk is a good source of selenium, and an 8 oz serving of 2% milk contains approximately 11% of the DRI for selenium.

The content of sodium in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Sodium is an electrolyte that is important in the maintenance of water balance and blood volume. An 8 oz serving of milk contains approximately 7% of the DRI for sodium.

The content of zinc in milk is shown in the Nutrient Content Tables. Zinc is a component of many enzymes and proteins, and is involved in gene regulation. Milk is a good source of zinc, and an 8 oz serving contains approximately 10% of the DRI for zinc.

Minor Biological Proteins & Enzymes

Other minor proteins and enzymes in milk that are of nutritional interest include lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase. There are many other enzymes in milk but these do not have a role in human nutrition.

Lactoferrin is an iron binding protein that plays a role in iron absorption and immune response. Many other functions of lactoferrin have been proposed, but their confirmation is still under study, including protection against bacterial and viral infections, and it’s role in inflammatory response and enzyme activity. The use of lactoferrin as an antimicrobial agent is discussed in the section on Antibacterial Properties of Milk in this website.

Lactoperoxidase is an enzyme that, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and thiocyanate, has antibacterial properties. The use of lactoperoxidase as an antimicrobial agent is discussed in the section on Antibacterial Properties of Milk in this website. Lactoperoxidase does not provide antimicrobial protection to fresh milk because hydrogen peroxide is not normally present in milk –it must be added to activate this system.

Lipases, a group of enzymes that break down fats, are present in milk but are inactivated by pasteurization, which increases the shelf life of milk. A popular belief among raw milk consumers is that the native lipase in milk plays an important role in the digestion of fat. Fat digestion begins in the stomach with gastric lipase, and the majority of fat digestion occurs in the small intestine, using enzymes secreted by the pancreas. The relative importance of the native milk lipase in digestion compared to the pancreatic lipases is not clear.

Lactase (ß-galactosidase) is the enzyme responsible for the breakdown of lactose into glucose and galactose for digestion. There is no lactase present in fresh milk. Any lactase present in milk products comes from lactic acid bacteria that are either added to milk on purpose, as in the case of yogurt and cheese, or that enter milk from airborne or other contamination. A popular belief is that people with lactose intolerance are able to drink raw milk but not pasteurized milk because the lactase present in raw milk is inactivated during pasteurization. Because there is no lactase present in fresh milk, this concept is a myth. People with lactose intolerance have, themselves, lower levels of lactase which creates problems when it comes to digesting large amounts of lactose in a timely manner. Naturally occurring lactase used to digest milk is normally secreted by the small intestine. Lactase found in any lactic acid bacteria present will minimally help to digest lactose when it is released as the milk is digested in the small intestine.

NUTRIENT CONTENT OF MILK

This table of the nutrient content values in milk from cows (whole, 2% fat, skim). Data used to compile these tables was obtained from the USDA Nutrient Database and the USDA DRI Tables and was created by Rizal Dairy Farms. For more information visit the USDA website.

Amount per 8 oz serving (1 cup), 240 ml
Component unit whole milk (3.25 % fat) reduced fat (2 % fat) skim (0.-1 %)
Overal Composition
water g 215,50 217.97 222.56
Energy kcal 146 122 83
Carbohydrate g 11.03 11.42 12.15
fat g 7.93 4.81 0.20
protein g 7.86 8.05 8.26
minerals g 1.68 1.73 1.84
Vitamins
Vitamin A(in Vitamin A added milk in the U.S.) µg 68 134 149
Thiamin (Vitamin B1) mg 0.107 0.095 0.110
Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) mg 0.447 0.451 0.446
Niacin (Vitamin B3) mg 0.261 0.224 0.230
Pantothenic Acid (Vitamin B5) mg 0.883 0.869 0.875
Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) mg 0.088 0.093 0.094
Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) µg 1.07 1.12 1.30
Vitamin C mg 0.0 0.5 0.0
Vitamin D IU 98 105 100
Vitamin E mg 0.15 0.07 0.02
Folate µg 12 12 12
Vitamin K µg 0.5 0.5 0.0
MINERALS (Ash)
Calcium mg 276 285 306
Copper mg 0.027 0.029 0.032
Iron mg 0.07 0.07 0.07
Magnesium mg 24 27 27
Manganese mg 0.007 0.007 0.007
Phosphorus mg 222 229 247
Potassium mg 349 366 382
Selenium µg 9.0 6.1 7.6
Sodium mg 98 100 103
Zinc mg 0.98 1.05 1.03
Carbohydrate Detail
Lactose g 12.83 12.22 12.47
Fat Detail
Cholesterol mg 24 20 5

Health Benefits of Milk

Health Benefits of Milk

There is a lot milk can do for you:

Protein: Helps build and repair body tissues, including muscles and bones, and plays a role in the creation of antibodies which fight infection.

Vitamin A: Aids bone and tooth development. Also aids in the maintenance of night vision and healthy skin.

Vitamin B12: Aids in red blood cell formation.

Vitamin B6: Factor in the conversion of food into energy and tissue formation, including bones.

Riboflavin: Factor in the conversion of food into energy and tissue formation.

Niacin: Aids in normal growth, and is a factor in the conversion of food into energy and tissue formation, including bones.

Thiamine: Releases energy from carbohydrate and aids normal growth.

Pantothenic acid: Factor in the conversion of food into energy and tissue formation, including bones.

Folate: Aids in red blood cell formation.

Vitamin D: Enhances calcium and phosphorus absorption, on which strong bones and teeth depend.

Calcium: Aids in the formation and maintenance of strong bones and healthy teeth.

Magnesium: Factor in bone and teeth health, conversion of food into energy and tissue formation.

Phosphorus: Factor in the formation and maintenance of strong bones and healthy teeth.

Potassium: Aids in the correct functioning of nerves and muscles.

Zinc: Factor in tissue formation, including bones, and conversion of food into energy.

Selenium: Factor in the correct functioning of the immune system, due to its antioxidant effect.